4 Care Instructions to Employ When Your Children Get Injured

No one wants to experience their child being injured, but if that situation should ever occur, knowing how to react could make a big difference in the final outcome. If you make a plan in advance, you will be able to react correctly to ensure the well-being of your child, even when your emotions are trying to lead you in the wrong direction. Here are the most important things to remember if your child is injured.

Stay Strong

Your child depends on you for guidance and strength and that is no different when they are injured. In fact, it is more true, since your child will likely be frightened themselves. In many situations, a child becoming more panicked can actually make the situation worse by increasing their heart rate and blood pressure. If they see you panicking, though, they will panic as well. That’s why it’s so important to not only stay calm throughout the situation but to stay strong, as well. Your child needs to see you taking initiative to provide for their care to truly know that “everything will be alright.” By doing this on their behalf, you help calm them down, thus aiding in their treatment.

Stay Safe

You know that you would ultimately give your life for your child if you needed to, but don’t let that heroic mindset complicate an injury situation in the life of your child. Of course, if putting yourself in harm’s way is necessary to prevent further injury to your child, then that is a necessary risk that must be accepted. However, if your child is stable, and assisting them would risk personal injury to you, it is likely best to protect yourself to ensure you can continue to assist your child. After all, in some situations, you may be the only link your child has to receiving the help they need, so if you become injured and unable to summon help, then both of you will suffer as a result.

Move Quickly

In the same vein as being strong, moving quickly is important in ensuring your children receive the best treatment and experience the best recovery. For some injuries, progression of symptoms will occur differently, and possibly more quickly, than in an adult. This means that what may be a minor concern in an adult could be a major concern to a child. Therefore, move quickly to summon help to ensure that something you didn’t think was a big deal ends up causing a major tragedy.

Be an Advocate

In many urgent care situations, patients are unable to advocate for themselves due to some level of incapacitation. This is regardless of age or maturity level. How much more, then, do you need to be an advocate for your child who, even if they’re not incapacitated, likely don’t understand the full extent of what’s happening to them. Ask questions, even if you think they’re silly, provide all the information you can when asked, and do your best to understand exactly what’s being done to treat your child and speak up if you think something is being done incorrectly.

If you child does experience an injury, it can also be used as a learning experience for both you and your child, once the treatment has ended, of course. Identify what went wrong to cause an injury and create an environment of greater safety, if possible. Go back over your response in your mind and try to identify areas where you could have practiced more patience or strength or action so that if you ever experience another situation like this, you’ll be better prepared. Most of all, just use it to be more thankful for the children you’ve been entrusted with, never taking them for granted, even on the tough days.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.